Alfred Hitchcock reportedly loved the story as a literary medium because it lends itself so well to creating unforeseen twists. Here are six clues for creating short stories with a twist.

Write stories with a twist: Track ONE:

There is something I call 'reader inversion' that applies when considering the ideal length for stories with a twist. In book pieces, readers are firmly attached to the character and trend of the story. Interrupting or violating all of that in the end with a twist, which negates all of that, can be disappointing and even heartbreaking for many readers. (The Sting is a masterful and notable exception.) In shorter pieces, the reader's investment doesn't have a chance to set itself up, so the twist doesn't interrupt the reader and, in fact, will generally be enjoyed as an unforeseen delight.

Write stories with a twist: Track TWO:

Perhaps, in a clumsy way of saying it, the final twist shouldn't come illogically from early plot, character traits, and motivation, but it shouldn't be telegraphed in any way before its introduction either. I enjoy writing Hitchcock type stories. My goal is always to introduce the twist at the last possible moment, in the closing sentence and even better, in the last words of the closing sentence. I usually spend more time creating the tour presentation than writing the rest of the piece. The author must have the turn clearly in the middle from the beginning. It is the goal to which you write.

Write stories with a twist: Track THREE:

Most of the story must be a subtle departure from the final twist. He dares not be obvious. He dares not raise a red flag (or even a pale rose) in the reader's mind. There should be nothing to suggest that the story does not progress to what appears to be its logical or legitimate conclusion, even if that is not fully understood. (Why read any story if you know how it will end?)

Write stories with a twist: Tip FOUR:

It is more acceptable to turn a bad boy into a good boy like the twist, than a good boy into a bad boy. It can be done with care and planning, but it requires great skill. It is human nature not to want good things to turn sour. This is extremely important when planning short stories with a twist.

Write stories with a twist: Tip FIVE:

Always make sure your story takes a turn without making the reader feel betrayed. I've archived several stories because in the end I couldn't find a way to overcome that obvious betrayal factor.

Write stories with a twist: Track SIX:

Spend a lot of time reading and analyzing the all-important structure of short Hitchcock stories. You'll find a large number simply by Googling 'short stories with a twist'.

A great short story, offering an acceptable and unexpected twist, is perhaps the most difficult in history to successfully complete. Happy writing! https://officialqtwists.co.uk/

Author's Bio: 

Alfred Hitchcock reportedly loved the story as a literary medium because it lends itself so well to creating unforeseen twists. Here are six clues for creating short stories with a twist.